Broadcasters Meet Podcasters?

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Brett:
As you know, Marty, Broadcasters Meet Podcasters, a track this year at Podcast Movement '19.

Marty:
Yeah, hallelujah. Finally.

Brett:
Three years, hallelujah. No, but three years in a row, Jacobs Media has presented this track at Podcast Movement. Podcast Movement is coming up for 2019 in Orlando, middle of August. I think it's pretty much the start of hurricane season. Yay!

Marty:
It's beautiful that time of year.

Brett:
Oh, yeah. But it's a conference track that Podcast Movement has expanded on, and Jacobs has really, actually, done a pretty good job of bringing it along. I think, giving more focus for broadcasters to take a look at podcasting.

Marty:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I don't think there's been any organization as active as Jacobs when it talks about bringing podcasting into the fold of broadcast.

Brett:
I believe so. You're right. They've done a great job with it. They've done a great job with it. Yeah, I think they're looking at it holistically, that it's a good thing. Don't look at it as a distraction. You can make some money from it, and you can help your clients make some money from it.

Marty:
It's an additional product in your arsenal.

Brett:
Exactly. Exactly. And we are audio experts.

Marty:
Yeah.

Brett:
Or so proclaimed to be when we were in radio.

Marty:
Yeah. That was, like, just a little 25-year stint of my life though.

Brett:
Mine too, and now we're out.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
Now we're out, and we're talking about it outside, looking in. But I wanted to kind of go over what's going on with this Podcasters Meet Broadcasters. I should say, I'm gonna call it right, Broadcasters Meet Podcasters track.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
A lot of radio people there. Now, I'll give you a little background when I went to Podcast Movement '18 last year in Philly.

Marty:
Okay.

Brett:
I can tell you without a doubt, there are very few podcasters that went to the Broadcasters Meet Podcasters track.

Marty:
Yeah.

Brett:
Guarantee it. And I heard of that, and I saw that very few did. They didn't mingle outside either. Radio people kind of kept their cliques together. You saw them going in their hoards walking around.

Marty:
Yeah, yeah. You guys are recording from your house. We have these big-ass studios.

Brett:
Exactly.

Marty:
I'm not down with this.

Brett:
Hopefully, this year that will be different. I hope so because I think both can learn from each other. In a holistic way, both can learn from each other. Podcasters can learn from broadcasters and vice versa.

Marty:
I hope so. I hope so.

Brett:
Yeah. It would be nice.

Marty:
Because radio has forgotten so much of what it actually is that that's why so many broadcasters are taking the leap into podcasting.

Brett:
Right.

Marty:
Or so many guys are finding their way over to XM Sirius.

Brett:
It's the freedom. It's the, "Hey, I can do that now? I don't have to look at a clock anymore?" Sort of thing.

Marty:
Right. Or the consultant.

Brett:
That too. Right.

Marty:
Beat 'em out, yeah.

Brett:
So, looking at what's going on, just to kind of give us some highlights so we have a reference point, and listener, we'll get you to where we're gonna go with this, so you kind of know what's going on, but it kicks off on Wednesday. They have a keynote speaker-

Marty:
Are they the ones that really screwed the pooch to radio? Is that what happened?

Brett:
You know, I think I've heard that.

Marty:
Yeah.

Brett:
I think so. But, you know, that's another episode. We'll talk about that. A track called Radio Leaders on Their Podcasting Strategies. True Crime, Turning Local Events into Hit Podcasts. Nothing like hitting a category that's hit its peak already.

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
Yeah.

Marty:
Yes, [Serial]. I remember that from a few years ago.

Brett:
Yeah. Branded Podcast Revenue Opportunities for Radio. Please put a bookmark in that, folks, because we're gonna come back to that, all right? And have a little bit of fun with that one.

Marty:
Not that it's a bad thing.

Brett:
No, but we're gonna … That's the main reason that Marty and I are together today. Keynote NPR and Audible veteran, Eric Nuzum – The Tweet that Could Define Podcasting Future.

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
10:1,5 that day, What Public Radio Knows that You Don't. And I tell you, folks, they're probably not going to tell you during that session. Real Listener Feedback – Podcast Movement's First Live Focus Group, could be interesting. Raise Your Voice, Smart Speaker Strategy for Podcasts. That may be the best one of the whole track. And that's another episode that we'll have to venture into in regards to-

Marty:
I have to hear why that might be the best.

Brett:
…audio search.

Marty:
Okay. Yeah, yeah. Well, assuming Google get-

Brett:
Setting yourself up for audio search. Yeah.

Marty:
Yeah, yeah.

Brett:
Podcast Makeover: Professional Broadcasters Critique Up and Coming Podcasts. Don't even go to that one.

Marty:
No, that's so lame.

Brett:
Popular Music in Pocasts. Here it comes. Big, big news coming out during Podcast Movement about podcast music.

Marty:
Really?

Brett:
Yes.

Marty:
Talk to me about that.

Brett:
I don't know what it is yet, but it's coming out. They're making a big, big stink about this other podcast, I'm hearing, that know the inside scoop. You're gonna be able to get music in your podcast for some price. May be not bad pricing.

Marty:
Really?

Brett:
It's gonna happen. Yeah.

Marty:
That's fascinating.

Brett:
They've come up with a solution for it.

Marty:
Right. For those of you who don't know podcasting, it has been virtually taboo to put like a Bob Dylan song or a Beatles song or a Lady Gaga song, and not because of any opposition to the music, but because the licensing is so … It is so complex to figure out exactly what you would pay to put a song in a podcast, and there's just no way to do it, so this is really, really exciting stuff.

Brett:
Yeah.

Marty:
So, all those podcasts you hear them using like, you know, actual tunes off your radio and XM Sirius, they're doing it illegally right now. Every one of them. Every one of them.

Brett:
Right. What this will do is open up another genre of podcasts.

Marty:
That's right. Absolutely.

Brett:
It will open it up in regards to a lot of people that are wanting to do a music podcast. Whether it's maybe a podcast all about Rush, all about Depeche Mode, whatever, you're gonna be able to do that now. It's gonna cost you a little bit of money. Again, I don't know the details, but apparently this news is going to be very beneficial to podcasting and podcasters.

Marty:
Sure. I'm excited about that. I would go just for that for crying out loud.

Brett:
Later on during Podcast Movement, Speed mentoring, Talk Directly with Podcasting Leading Experts.

Marty:
No idea what that is.

Brett:
Apparently there would be some from radio, but okay, anyway. Now they've actually … I take that back. They do have some experts within the field, like Rob Greenlee.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
Dave Jackson.

Marty:
Eh.

Brett:
Seth Wrestler.

Marty:
Okay, Seth, I buy into.

Brett:
Ed Ryan, I-

Marty:
What qualifies as an expert? Is it just a guy that's done a podcast?

Brett:
I guess, or like an Ed Ryan who puts together a daily-

Marty:
Clickbait.

Brett:
-clickbait. Yeah. So, that's it right there. Let's kind of go back to that branded podcast idea.

Marty:
Yeah.

Brett:
Just recently. This is kind of inside baseball stuff. There was a webinar helping radio stations increase their podcast revenue called Branded Podcasts – How to Sell Branded Podcasts.

Marty:
Very catchy.

Brett:
And it was a good webinar. I'm not gonna say who put it together because it's really neither here nor there. It's just knowledge that it's out there to help radio stations with their clients to create podcasts. Now, both you and I know branded podcasts are a good idea.

Marty:
Absolutely. Fantastic idea.

Brett:
They are a good idea. After this conference you're going to be called upon as a business owner, "Hey, we're doing a branded podcast. This is our new initiative. We wanna talk to you about this. This is the coolest, newest thing, and here's what we're going to do." So, let's talk about what to be aware of.

Marty:
Yeah, sure.

Brett:
And also the pros and cons, what to be aware of. For me, the pros are, yeah, look at it. It's a radio station. They have studios, professional studios, because if you don't have it in your office or your business, it's an opportunity.

Marty:
Okay.

Brett:
Okay. What do you think pro?

Marty:
Well, pro, I think it is a way to extend your voice. I think podcasting is an evergreen medium that is a no waste medium because it goes out into the interwebs, and it stays there forever, so as long as you're putting your message out that represents your business, your business model, your plan, your ideals, do it.

Brett:
I think we have a lot of list of cons for this one, though, that's the problem.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
Again, both of us having the large amount of time in radio, we know exactly what drives radio and radio reps and radio station ownership and management.

Marty:
Right. And to be clear, Brett was in the sales and marketing side of radio. I did some sales and marketing, but I was primarily in programming.

Brett:
Right.

Marty:
So, that being said-

Brett:
That being said.

Marty:
-there are cons of using radio for all of that.

Brett:
Namely, just beware that they have incentives of their own to get you to do this. Okay. The concept is going to be they're gonna come in and talk to you about … They're gonna create this branded podcast potentially, maybe, it's going to be one of their on-air people that's gonna do a podcast about local breweries, okay? And you own a local brewery, you know? You make your own beer, and that sort of thing, a craft brewer, okay? So, they're gonna wanna talk to you. They're gonna wanna interview you along with five or six other craft brewers in your market. Each episode stands alone. It's gonna be a great series. It will be because that on-air person is into craft brewing.

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
They love it. They want to get into your business. They want to know "Why'd you do this?" And the different flavors, what's coming up and such like that. So, that series is gonna be out on their website, and it's gonna be promoted, listened to.

Marty:
It's gonna be easy to talk about for any of the personalities that they have recording breaks, you know, they're gonna be able to cross-mention it across all their, you know?

Brett:
To that end, say yes to that.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
It's a great PR piece. Take the audio. Use it for yourself. They're gonna talk to you about it. You're gonna have a blast.

Marty:
Yep.

Brett:
About two or three weeks later, you're gonna get a call from your sales rep saying, "Hey, did you have a fun time?"

Marty:
"Mm-hmm."

Brett:
"You want to create your own podcast?".

Marty:
"Ooh!"

Brett:
"We can do that. Let's do that."

Marty:
"Okay. What are we gonna talk about?"

Brett:
"Well, what do you wanna talk about?"

Marty:
"Oh, no. But I, you know, I do my craft brew, I do my brewery."

Brett:
"Right, right, right. But let's talk about your craft brewery. So, what do you wanna talk about?"

Marty:
"Uh, my beer."

Brett:
"Okay, so let's go in studio, and we'll talk about a beer week. How's that?"

Marty:
"Um, sounds a little thin."

Brett:
"Yeah, it does, doesn't it?"

Marty:
"Yeah."

Brett:
"But we're gonna charge you $3,000 a month to do that though because-"

Marty:
That's right, because you're gonna get an ad schedule with it.

Brett:
"-an ad schedule, our radio station's a bullhorn. I have qualitative here to show you that our listeners loved craft beer."

Marty:
"Ratings that show you have?"

Brett:
"No, no, no, not ratings qualitative because, you know, we don't subscribe. You know, I've got all qualitative to show you."

Marty:
"Okay."

Brett:
"And we're gonna put it on our website, but I can't show you the numbers on the website, the views on it, you know?"

Marty:
"Yeah, because that just doesn't work right now."

Brett:
"Yeah, and don't ask me how many people really go to our website or listen to audio on our website."

Marty:
Right. It kind of reminds me of one of those infomercials from the '70s where the Asian kids were, like, slamming their hands down on the thing.

Brett:
Exactly.

Marty:
That's how many there are.

Brett:
So, what we're saying is yes, the follow-up call from the sales rep could be good. If you're interested in doing a podcast, go ahead and do it, but be careful. Know why you're doing this podcast.

Marty:
Have strategy.

Brett:
Have a strategy of why you're doing it. What we're saying is the radio station probably won't bring a strategy to you.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
It's the they're going to take the emotional high that you're off of from doing that podcast and having all that love given to you by the on-air person and the sales staff and maybe a few listeners that came in and said, "Wow, we heard you on Joe show podcast."

Marty:
Think about this, man, isn't it natural that when somebody does something like that, they go, "Hey, guys, I'm going to be, and check this out." They're gonna tell all their closest friends and family. They're gonna tell all their best customers about it, so they make sure that they know that this podcast they're on, that's about me.

Brett:
Mm-hmm. Sure.

Marty:
It's about my expertise. You're gonna get instant gratification from the closest people around you. That's great. They're already fans of yours.

Brett:
Right.

Marty:
You don't need a radio station to talk to them. You don't need to pay a radio station $3,000 a month to talk to them because you can talk to them, and chances are they will pay you for your beer.

Brett:
Right. Probably so.

Marty:
Just saying. There's a chance.

Brett:
Right. So, us giving you this information is arming you to throw back some questions to them because, again, inherently, this whole idea is a good idea because the radio station does have opportunities to help you grow your business. If you strategically take a look at how you create your own podcast as a season, okay? Could be that they come back and say, "Hey, would you like to create your own series?" Could be six or seven episodes. Good. Look at it that way. Now, look at how you're gonna do those six or seven, okay? Is your craft brew location, okay? Are you a big soccer base?

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
Maybe you should be talking about soccer with it. You know your clientele.

Marty:
Right. What is the culture and lifestyle of the people that you see coming in your doors? Who is it that is buying? If you have distribution on a local, statewide, or regional basis, what are the demographics, psychographics of the people that are buying your particular product? What is it that is attractive to people about your product? And then, try to know as much about that person's lifestyle, and talk as much about that kind of thing within your podcast. Is it soccer? Is it dark beers, you know?

Brett:
Any sports. Right. It could be a food pairing with the beer.

Marty:
Sure. Absolutely.

Brett:
Anything that's happening. What you're not going to get is what we just talked about this last two minutes, you're not gonna get that from sales rep.

Marty:
Yeah. You're gonna have to go in there with that yourself.

Brett:
Yes. It's not gonna happen. It's not going to happen.

Marty:
Absolutely. If you do not go in there with it yourself. In fact, here's what they'll do, "Well, you know, what I was really thinking was just, like, we just come in here and we talk. We just talk."

Brett:
Because that's what the on-air personality wants to do.

Marty:
Well, but the thing of it is the on-air personality wants to do that because the on-air personality has about 15 other things that they have to do back at the station because radio has bled itself dry of having enough people and workforce in place to be able to do anything effective. Which is why we don't have anything called local radio, by and large, anymore. Even stations that are "dominating local radio" aren't local radio anymore.

Brett:
So, you are going to have to come in with your own concept.

Marty:
Yes.

Brett:
You are going to have to stress that you're going to do this. They are not the professionals in this field.

Marty:
Not a bit.

Brett:
Not in the least. They're professionals at selling you airtime to support it.

Marty:
Yes.

Brett:
And that's where they're getting their commission is selling you the additional airtime that you're going to buy to promote your podcast.

Marty:
Yep. Now, here's what I always find interesting, okay? Because you can find out how popular, what kind of authority the radio station has online. You can find that out. Look at community events that are real popular, and just do a search for that community event. If a radio station's website pops up to the top on that one, that's not really their authority. That's that event's authority. Look to see, though, why people go to that station. Why are people going to that station? Now, what we do know about radio is that radio still has listeners. It still has listeners.

Brett:
You bet. You bet.

Marty:
But where they disconnect with this is that they do not have any idea of how to put a strategy together to make a podcast successful for a business. They might have podcasts of their own where their radio hosts do podcasts that are basically just riffs off their show like after hours, but they don't have any track record, none whatsoever, of building shows that are solely based on the universe of this business. When you go online, you're stepping outside of the universe of that radio station, and you're stepping into the internet. So, Mr. Business Owner, what's your universe? That's where that radio station has to go and, if they don't take you there, they have no strategy to take you outside of their universe and then place you solidly within where your wheelhouse is, move on dot org.

Brett:
What they're going to suggest is, that because it's such a match of your category business to their listeners, that, yes, that podcast should live on their website without telling you that, number one, most people don't listen to website, they listen to podcasts on websites.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
It's on your smartphone.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
Okay? Most radio station smart apps are not designed to play audio as a podcast.

Marty:
That's right. Because they want to push their live stream. They want to push their live signal.

Brett:
Right. Exactly. Exactly. Thirdly, if you do want to do this, get away from the website. Yes, great, that your audio, your podcast, your series can live on their website, but if they don't suggest that you have this podcast live on its own, that it can be found in Apple podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn, all the other platforms that are the norm for podcast listeners outside of the radio station, they're doing you a disservice, and they are not going to suggest this.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
They're not going to do it.

Marty:
That is correct.

Brett:
That may be the biggest red flag. If you do not hear them advise you to do that or to help you do that, runaway.

Marty:
Right. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Runaway.

Brett:
Because that message that you've crafted and you spent a lot of time putting together that series of seven, you get excited about, and it just lives on their website, and it goes nowhere else, you've wasted your time.

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
You really have in the long run.

Marty:
It's kind of interesting because I left radio in 2002. I snuck back in when we had an emergency down in Nashville, and I got back involved in radio there for a couple of years, but I left radio in 2002. Then, from 2005 on, or 2005 to about 2008, I did a podcast called Nothing Flashy. It was just me talking into a microphone about current events and daily things. I got so many bookings off of that back then, and now the industry, it is an industry now, is just swelling like crazy.

Marty:
So, when you talk about things that matter to your core customer in a way that bridges that gap from where they're at to your business, that's when your business becomes infinitely more important to them, and they are infinitely more likely to do business with you. Radio stations don't get that yet because they're not even doing that with their own podcasts, outside of NPR. NPR is willing to walk away from the signal. NPR is willing to walk away from the signal, which is why they're being successful with their podcasts.

Brett:
They get the emotional tie that a podcast can have with your audience that you're building this image of your business. Again, we go back to the craft brewing that every category is competitive. Craft brewing is very competitive. You can buy craft brew pretty much anywhere you want, so what makes that one logo different than the other? There's a story behind why your craft brew is better than the other in your mind, and it's valid. You've got to tell people.

Marty:
Yeah,

Brett:
And this is a great platform to do so, and that lends toward any business category.

Marty:
That's right. That's exactly right.

Brett:
Any business category. What we're trying to lay out here, and we're being very negative about radio and by design because we do know the ins and outs. We both have been in it, in and out, for 25 years. I left it close to two years ago. We do know their drive, and it's not necessarily to your benefit, okay? I think they're trying, but there are some pieces missing to this that you've got to be aware that you're gonna spend, I guess I look at it as spend a lot of time for nothing, and you're gonna get turned off by doing a podcast because it didn't do what you wanted it to do.

Marty:
Right, and you're gonna say, "Well, if a radio station can't make it go, well, then gosh, dot, dot, dot …"

Brett:
Right.

Marty:
Well, here's the deal. People have "purchased ads" from radio stations for years that didn't work. The reason they didn't work is because the "marketing consultant", did not care enough to tell the person, "Okay, in order to reach your audience effectively to generate revenues for you, you're going to have to do this many commercials in a week," because they were afraid you were not going to write the check, so, what they did is they backed down from it, from what would be really effective to only speak to your pain and tolerance. What is the tolerance level you have for curing the pain that you have right now by not having customers?

Marty:
Okay, so if it would be, for instance, in Columbus, Ohio, you know, a budget of $3,000 to $5,000 a month would not be really anything big. That would be a very common ad budget. Same in Nashville, but that would be just your average schedule. A strong schedule, if your business brand needed it to convey that message, could be as much as $10,000 or $12,000 a month, and people are like, "Oh, my goodness, that is a lot of money." It's a lot of money if you're not seeing any money coming back in …

Brett:
Right. If it doesn't work, I've got a toilet you can flush it in.

Marty:
Right on.

Brett:
Everybody does.

Marty:
The thing of it is, though, you have to make sure you're paired with the right people to get your voice heard.

Brett:
That is exactly the message we are putting together here for you for this podcast is that if you have an interest in doing a podcast, great. You got excited to be on that on-air host's podcast. Great, you know, talking about craft brewery. Fantastic. You got a nice little PR case out of it. People talked about it. They're excited about it. They come back. You do want to do a series. Okay. Here are some steps that you do to take to protect yourself, to protect your time, to make sure that it does work.

Marty:
You know, here's the other thing, too, and this is just kind of where it's at. You really need to, you know, you're the owner of the business, and your marketing, your advertising is really created in order for you to go ahead and go about your business. We already know that the radio station is going to send somebody over to you that's going to have this strategy to go ahead and exploit all the facets of your business. I cannot help but think that even by calling Brett or myself or another, you know, I can't speak for other podcast production companies. I don't know anybody. I've known Brett for maybe 25 years now.

Brett:
Mm-hmm.

Marty:
Yeah, when we worked for the same company. But I know that we would both be willing to just, "Look. We don't have to produce it. Go ahead and produce it with a radio station, but let's talk through a strategy. Let's map out a strategy for you," I think, would you be happy to do that?

Brett:
Sure. You bet. Because I do believe that this strategy that the radio stations putting together for you does make sense. There are just parts that are missing that won't make it happen right.

Marty:
Right.

Brett:
Because they don't have, we're just going to call it just reality, podcast consultant, on their staff to know how to use podcasting to its most effective being.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
I don't care if it's one episode or six or three years in, there's a strategy to this as with any marketing tool, and that's what podcasting is – a marketing tool. It's not just a fun and games. You can have fun doing it, of course. I encourage you. Don't do it unless you have some fun, but there is some strategy to it because this can become something very, very versatile, important, long tail, that can be talked about for a very long time.

Marty:
Sure. And it can be repromoted over and over and over again.

Brett:
If done right.

Marty:
That's right.

Brett:
If done right.

Marty:
But you have to do it correctly. So, you know, if you have questions about those types of things, you can reach out to me, and I'll go ahead and put out my email address info@podovox.com. Info at P-O-D-O-V-O-X dot com. And, Brett, you can reach him at Circle 270 Media, what's your email?

Brett:
Podcasts@circle270media.com. But I think the main thing is really go to our websites, honestly, when it comes down to it.

Marty:
Sure.

Brett:
Websites, let's talk about your website.

Marty:
Sure. P-O-D-O-V-O-X Podovox.com.

Brett:
And you can go to Circle270Media.com as well. If you're in Marty's area, or it's a little bit more convenient to talk to him face to face or whatever, we'll flip back and forth. It's not a problem, so.

Marty:
Sure. Yeah.

Brett:
But, you know, we're pretty much worldwide when it comes down to it.

Marty:
That's the truth.

Brett:
We're here to help, and honestly, we both have gotten into and are doing podcast consulting because we love the medium.

Marty:
Sure. I was talking to somebody about coming up here and doing this with you because we're recording this out of really nice studios here in Columbus, Ohio where Brett works in conjunction with them. It's Studio-

Brett:
511 Media.

Marty:
511 Media. I'm so sorry.

Brett:
No.

Marty:
Beautiful studios. Better than many, many radio stations I've worked at. Actually, it reminds me of the CD101 studios when they first launched down on South High Street.

Brett:
That would be the best analogy.

Marty:
Yeah.

Brett:
Best example.

Marty:
It really does.

Brett:
We were talking about that before we started recording, radio stations that would have something like this, and you're right because of what they do with some live bands and interview situations. Yep. You're right [cross talk]

Marty:
You know, the thing of it is is that you can come in here into this studio and sit down and record … The sound's pretty good, I think, right? What you're listening to right now? Other than it being my voice, because there's no sweeter sound to anybody than their own voice and their own name, right?

Brett:
Their own voice, right, right.

Marty:
If you're in the Columbus area, for sure, you want to be working with Studio 511. If you are down in Lexington, Kentucky, or if you are in Nashville, Tennessee, or if you are in Louisville, Kentucky, that's really where I am working. I live in eastern Kentucky now, rural eastern Kentucky, because I'm around family. The cool thing is, is that I have the ability to be in Nashville and Lexington and Louisville and even Huntington, West Virginia, very quickly and very easily, and I don't actually have to be there with you to make this happen, what?

Brett:
Right. I know. It's magic. Yes, it's magic. No, that's the way the world is right now too. But, yeah, please give us a call, email, contact, if you are looking at expanding any ideas at a radio station has brought to you. Again, we're not all negative about radio, but I think there's some opportunities that if done wisely, we'll work to your benefit.

Marty:
Absolutely. Absolutely. So, yeah, give us a call.

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Joining me is Marty Daniels, owner of Podovox Professional Podcast Services.

Podcast Movement 2019, or PM19, includes a conference track entitled Broadcasters Meet Podcasters. One session in this track is called Branded Podcasts: Revenue Opportunities for Radio.

We have the inside information about this session, and offer our insights to radio advertisers who are going to be presented this marketing idea.

The good and the bad.

For the third consecutive year, Jacobs Media is partnering with the organizers of Podcast Movement conference. This track is designed to help the radio and podcast industries to discuss how the two sectors can work together. In what’s been dubbed a conference-within-a-conference, the three days of sessions in Orlando in August 2019 focuses not only on successful podcasting strategies but also where podcasting is heading.

Recorded in Studio C at the 511 Studios in the Brewery District, downtown Columbus, OH.